By Mahsa Aliaskari

Seyfarth Synopsis:  Today’s post is by our colleague, Mahsa Aliaskari, Seyfarth Shaw LLP’s Senior Counsel. Mahsa has advised and defended businesses with up to 100,000+ nationwide employees on U.S. immigration compliance programs and practices.  She and Angelo A. Paparelli — along with former USCIS Director, Leon Rodriguez, noted worksite

By: Elizabeth McKeeGabriel Mozes and Jason E. Burritt

Seyfarth Synopsis: The U.S. Department of State has recently issued a new supplemental questionnaire that will enable officers at U.S. Consulates and Embassies to carry out enhanced and burdensome screenings of certain applicants for nonimmigrant and immigrant visas to the U.S.

As part of

By Brian D. Potter, Gabriel Mozes, and Michelle Gergerian

Seyfarth Synopsis: On May 25, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit ruled that President Trump’s travel ban should remain on hold, upholding a preliminary injunction issued in March 2017 by a lower court.

The order in question is the Trump

By Jason E. Burritt, Michelle Gergerian, and Dawn M. Lurie

Seyfarth Synopsis: If Congress fails to pass a funding bill by midnight on Friday, April 28, resulting in a federal government shutdown, it would trigger numerous immigration-related ripple effects on employers, both large and small. The federal government, through its various agencies,

By Jason E. Burritt

Seyfarth Synopsis: In light of recent events related to the most recent Executive Order banning travel to the United States for nationals from certain countries, please continue reading for more detailed information regarding this Executive Order and what employers may wish to consider in response. 

On Friday, January 27, President

By Brian A. Wadsworth

Employers are well aware that the protections provided by 42 U.S.C. § 1981 extend to both United States citizens and permanent residents, colloquially referred to as “green card holders.”

Some employers, however, may be unaware that lawfully present aliens who are not green card holders may also be protected by § 

By: Pavan Dhillon

Canada, much like the United States, has adopted increasingly protectionist immigration policies that are intended to strengthen the Canadian economy by restricting both temporary resident and permanent residency applications. Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) administer and adjudicate Canadian Immigration related

By Angelo A. Paparelli

Samuel Herbert, Her Majesty’s Home Secretary from 1931-32 (the British equivalent of the U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security), could well have been speaking about two recent immigration-related events when he quipped that “bureaucracy” is “a difficulty for every solution.”

One is an October 30 Settlement Agreement between Indian It consulting giant, Infosys, and the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas.The other is an October 18 decision by U.S. federal district court judge, William J. Martini, involving the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and CAMO Technologies, a much smaller Indian IT consulting firm.  

Both reflect a victory, of sorts, for Indian IT firms over U.S. immigration bureaucrats and enforcement agents, and both shed light on the little-discussed crossroads where ambiguous immigration rules bisect the relations between corporate customers and their technology consultants.
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