Privacy & Social Media

By Esther Slater McDonald, Paul Yovanic Jr. and Thomas E. Ahlering

Seyfarth Synopsis: In light of the uncertainties surrounding lawsuits alleging violations of the Illinois Information Biometric Privacy Act (BIPA), the Northern District of California has taken a firm position on a plaintiff’s Article III standing. U.S. District Judge James Donato delivered opinions in

By: Elizabeth McKeeGabriel Mozes and Jason E. Burritt

Seyfarth Synopsis: The U.S. Department of State has recently issued a new supplemental questionnaire that will enable officers at U.S. Consulates and Embassies to carry out enhanced and burdensome screenings of certain applicants for nonimmigrant and immigrant visas to the U.S.

As part of

By Hillary J. Massey

iStock_000048141232_LargeEmployees’ social media activities often play a key role in workplace investigations.

For example, an employee may complain that a coworker sent a harassing Facebook message or posted something offensive on Twitter regarding race, religion, or disability. Employers handling investigations into such conduct should be aware that state laws may restrict

By Dawn Solowey and Ariel Cudkowicz

On June 1, 2015, in a 8-1 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in the religious-discrimination case of EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc. We blogged about that opinion on the day of the decision.

But many employers are wondering: now what?

By Adam Vergne and Chuck Walters

Following a national trend, Montana and Virginia have become the nineteenth and twentieth states to enact laws restricting employer access to the social media accounts of applicants and employees.[1]

Virginia’s law, which takes effect on July 1, 2015, prohibits requesting (or requiring) the disclosure of usernames and/or passwords

By Johanna T. Wise and Andrew J. Masak

Every day new stories about the uses (and misuses) of drones surface in the media.

They have been used to: photograph the 2015 Winter X Games, assist in firefighting operations, monitor agricultural drought, monitor pipelines in remote areas of the world, and take pictures for realtors.  One

By: Erin Dougherty Foley

On Monday, Apple unveiled its new MacBook (which is as pretty as it is light and nimble), number of new health related apps called “ResearchKit” (that claim to be able to help diagnose and monitor the progress of diseases like diabetes and Parkinson’s) and the much anticipated Apple Watch.  The watch

By: Jonathan L. Brophy

Employers know that the National Labor Relations Board may scrutinize their policies to determine if they violate the National Labor Relations Act (the “Act”) – and specifically, Section 7’s protections for “concerted activity.”

When searching for clear guidance on what standards to follow, employers soon find that the NLRB’s most recent

By: Carlos Lopez

Companies cannot have every employee with a Twitter account spreading (mis)information about their business, products or services to hundreds or thousands of followers, but the National Labor Relations Board is sending mixed signals about what, if anything, employers can do about it.

Good News: While the Board has been a relentless foe