Absence Management & Reasonable Accommodation

By Saman Haque and Ellen E. McLaughlin

Seyfarth Synopsis: In a recent ruling, Roberts v. Gestamp (Decided August 15, 2022), the Fourth Circuit reversed, in part, the lower court’s decision to grant the Company’s motion for summary judgment on the grounds that the employee did not follow the Company’s “usual and customary” absence notice procedures as required by the Family
Continue Reading How A Facebook Messenger Chat Can Become a “Usual and Customary” FMLA Notice Procedure For a Company

By Erin Dougherty Foley and Kimberly Shen, Summer Fellow

Seyfarth Synopsis: On July 14, 2022, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit affirmed summary judgment in an Americans With Disabilities Act discrimination and retaliation case filed by an employee with multiple sclerosis. In rejecting the plaintiff’s claims, the Court’s decision points to the importance of employers having
Continue Reading Seventh Circuit Decision Highlights the Importance of Designing a Legally Compliant PTO Policy

By Gillian B. LeporeMeg Toth, and Sara Eber Fowler

Seyfarth Synopsis: Illinois recently amended its Child Bereavement Leave Act to expand the reasons for leave, including miscarriage and stillbirth, and adds additional covered family members.  The law will now be called the “Family Bereavement Leave Act” and goes into effect on January 1, 2023. 

On June 9,
Continue Reading Illinois Expands Its Bereavement Leave Act

By Michael J. Cederoth, Rachel Duboff*, and Erin Dougherty Foley

Seyfarth Synopsis: Accommodation requests continue to vex employers as they attempt to balance an employee’s religious beliefs with the overall needs of the business operations. But try they must. 

Notwithstanding the mangled Yoda quote above, as more employees return to in-person work, it is important to remember an
Continue Reading There Is No Try: Elimination of Religious Belief Conflict to Work Obligations Accommodation Must Do …. ( Unless Doing So Would Cause Undue Hardship)

By Erin Dougherty Foley and James Nasiri*

Seyfarth Synopsis: On February 18, 2022, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit affirmed a district court decision granting a municipal employer’s motion for summary judgment in a case brought by a former garbage man alleging race discrimination under Section 1983. The Court’s decision, which is rooted in the Town’s
Continue Reading First Circuit Sides with Employer in Race Discrimination Suit Brought by Former Garbage Man

By Glenn J. SmithHoward M. WexlerEphraim J. Pierre, and Bill S. Varade

Seyfarth Synopsis: The New Jersey Supreme Court held that a plaintiff need not plead an adverse employment action such as a termination or demotion to establish a prima facie case of failure to accommodate a disability under New Jersey’s Law Against Discrimination (“LAD”).
Continue Reading No Adverse Action? No Problem: NJ Supreme Court Eases Pleading Burden for Disability Claims under LAD

By Cary Reid Burke and Stan Hill

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals recently provided several reminders to employers regarding their obligations under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), in vacating summary judgment for the employer in Ramji v. Hospital Housekeeping Systems, Inc., Case No. 19-13461 (11th Cir. April 6, 2021).

First, an employer cannot get
Continue Reading 11th Circuit to Employers: Heed Your FMLA Obligations

By Honore N. Hishamunda and Erin Dougherty Foley

Seyfarth Synopsis: Employees can sometimes sour on jobs they transfer to and, this in turn, can create practical and legal risk for employers, particularly where an employee changed jobs in connection with a disability accommodation. A recent decision from the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, however, makes
Continue Reading Your Accommodation Can’t Be That Bad, You Asked For It….

By Loren Gesinsky and Samuel I. Rubinstein

Seyfarth Synopsis: With telework seeming like the new normal for many, employers and employees have been wondering whether pandemic telework will be seen as creating a presumptive right to post-pandemic telework as a reasonable accommodation for employees with disabilities. On September 8, 2020, the EEOC answered “no” to this burning question in its
Continue Reading Pandemic Telework Does Not Create Presumptive Right to Telework Post-Pandemic According to EEOC

By Kevin Fritz and Erin Dougherty Foley

Seyfarth Synopsis: Athleisure company is rightfully able to terminate the employment of individual with physical limitations, despite that individual’s ability to delegate such functions of her position. See Tonyan v. Dunham’s Athleisure Corp., No. 19-2939 (7th Cir. 2020).

Angela Tonyan was employed by Dunham’s Athleisure Corp. as a store manager. She
Continue Reading 7th Circuit has Spoken: Two Pound Lifting Limit, and Other Restrictions Can be an Unreasonable Accommodation under the ADA