By Eden Anderson

Seyfarth Synopsis: Ninth Circuit concludes in trilogy of disability access cases that complaints must specifically allege unlawful conditions.

Over the years, ADA Title III complaints filed by the plaintiff’s bar have gotten progressively more vague with respect to the barriers alleged.  This is no coincidence: Some have stated outright that they keep those allegations vague so businesses


Continue Reading Ninth Circuit Makes Clear In Trilogy of Decisions That Disability Access Complaints Without Specific Barrier Allegations Will Be Dismissed

By Honore N. Hishamunda and Erin Dougherty Foley

Seyfarth Synopsis: Employees can sometimes sour on jobs they transfer to and, this in turn, can create practical and legal risk for employers, particularly where an employee changed jobs in connection with a disability accommodation. A recent decision from the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, however, makes
Continue Reading Your Accommodation Can’t Be That Bad, You Asked For It….

By Samantha L. Brooks and Erin Dougherty Foley

Seyfarth Synopsis: In McCann v. Badger Mining Corporation, — F.3d. — (7th Cir. 2020), the Seventh Circuit affirmed summary judgment and held that no jury could conclude that plaintiff’s position would not have been eliminated “but for” her disability.

In McCann, the plaintiff alleged that she had been discriminated against
Continue Reading Seventh Circuit Affirms Summary Judgment in Disability Suit Where No Evidence that Disability Was “But For” Cause of Position Elimination

By James L. CurtisAdam R. Young, Matthew A. Sloan, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis: Employees who complain about safety measures to protect employees from COVID-19 may be protected from retaliation by federal and state laws.  Employees who refuse to perform job functions may also be protected.

News media reports during the COVID-19 pandemic highlight
Continue Reading Whistleblower Liability for Employee Safety Complaints During the COVID-19 Pandemic

By Erin Dougherty Foley and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis:  The U.S. Court of Appeals in the Seventh Circuit has recently decided a case involving an extremely obese bus driver and denied his claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 12101–12213, as amended by the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA), Pub. L.
Continue Reading 7th Circuit Rules that Extreme Obesity is Not an ADA Impairment (at Least on These Facts)

By Jennifer Mora

Seyfarth Synopsis: Given this recent New Mexico medical marijuana law change discussed here, employers in all jurisdictions should review their current policies and practices addressing “weed at work” and continue to monitor developments in this evolving area of law.

Although New Mexico has had a medical marijuana law in place since 2007, it did not contain
Continue Reading New Mexico Just Became Employee-Friendly to Medical Marijuana Users

By Jade M. Gilstrap and Alex S. Drummond

Seyfarth Synopsis: The D.C. Circuit recently revived a single-leg amputee’s claim that his former employer failed to accommodate his disability by refusing his request for a classroom aide. In reversing the lower court’s decision in part, the two-member panel found triable issues of fact existed regarding whether forcing the plaintiff to
Continue Reading Requiring Employees Seeking Reasonable Accommodations to “Feel the Burn” May Violate ADA

By Kelsey P. Montgomery

Seyfarth Synopsis: Employee committed to taking opioids loses his job and his disability discrimination lawsuit because he refused to consider alternative pain management.

The “interactive process” required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as amended by the ADA Amendments Act, is a two-way street between an employee and his or her employer.  Consistent with
Continue Reading Employees are ALSO Required to Engage in the Interactive Process Under the ADA

By Ariel D. Fenster

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals recently held that telecommuting can be a reasonable accommodation under the ADA when the employee is able to perform the essential functions of the position remotely and the request is for a finite period. Mosby-Meachem v. Memphis Light, Gas & Water Division, No 17-5483 (6th Cir.
Continue Reading “A Telecommute Dispute” – What is a Reasonable Accommodation Under the ADA?

By John P. Phillips

Seyfarth Synopsis: Complying with the ADA, particularly when an employee has a mental health-related disability, can be challenging. Fortunately, a recent decision out of the Seventh Circuit provides helpful guidance for employers struggling to accommodate employees with mental health issues while at the same time maintaining safe and productive workplaces. The decision makes clear that in
Continue Reading Rock and a [Softer] Hard Place: Seventh Circuit Eases the Burden for Accommodating Employees with Mental Health Disabilities