By James L. CurtisAdam R. Young, Matthew A. Sloan, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis: Employees who complain about safety measures to protect employees from COVID-19 may be protected from retaliation by federal and state laws.  Employees who refuse to perform job functions may also be protected.

News media reports

By James L. CurtisKay R. Bonza, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis:  A railcar cleaning company and its executive officers were recently charged in a 22-count indictment with conspiracy, violating worker safety standards resulting in worker deaths, violating the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and for submitting false documents to

Mark A. Lies, II, Patrick D. Joyce, Adam R. Young

iStock_000060649530_MediumSeyfarth Synopsis: OSHA’s new final rules call into question mandatory post-accident drug screenings and safety incentive programs, open the door to new retaliation citations, and will require employers to post OSHA logs electronically.   

Introduction

On May 12, 2016 the Occupational Safety and

bogBy Mark A. Lies, II and Craig B. Simonsen

Employers today can find themselves in a seemingly untenable dilemma when they have violence threaten to invade their workplaces.  Two recent cases illustrate the competing liabilities that employers face in their decision-making as to how to respond to workplace violence.

In one case, decided by the