By Howard Wexler, Esq. and Samuel Sverdlov, Esq.

Seyfarth Synopsis: An Administrative Law Judge held that an employer’s policy of prohibiting employees from conducting personal business at work, along with its social media and solicitation/distribution policies, violated the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”).

In Casino Pauma, the NLRB’s General Counsel (“GC”) alleged that four

In our final installment of the blog series that previews employment cases being heard by the Supreme Court, the Zaborowski case will allow the Court to opine on the enforceability of arbitration agreements that may have questionable (or “unconscionable”) terms. Read on for more.

Once Again SCOTUS Takes on the Enforceability of Arbitration Agreements

 By

By Adam Smiley and Samuel Sverdlov

Veterans Day, which initially was conceived as a day to commemorate the end of World War I, has evolved into an annual celebration to honor those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces.

On Veterans Day we self-reflect on the sacrifices of those who served our country, and

By Marc R. Jacobs

In a closely watched case, the Colorado Supreme Court ruled that an employer could lawfully terminate an employee who tested positive for marijuana in a random drug test, even though the employee’s use of marijuana was off-duty and prescribed under Colorado’s Medical Marijuana Amendment. Coats v. Dish Network, LLC, 2015

By: Karla Grossenbacher

In what is quickly becoming the newest trending topic in class action litigation, another class action has been filed alleging the disclosure of employee personally identifiable information due to a cyber attack.

This time, the employer is the federal government, and another target in the lawsuit is the third party vendor allegedly

By Dawn Solowey and Ariel Cudkowicz

On June 1, 2015, in a 8-1 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in the religious-discrimination case of EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc. We blogged about that opinion on the day of the decision.

But many employers are wondering: now what?

By Mark A. Lies, II, James L. Curtis, and Craig B. Simonsen

Three engineers

Last week the Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced and issued a 161 page final rule to increase protections for construction workers in confined spaces. 80 Fed. Reg. 25366 (May 4, 2015), which is effective on August 3, 2015.

Confined

By Sam Schwartz-Fenwick and Amanda Sonneborn

In last week’s oral argument on the constitutionality of same-sex marriage bans, Chief Justice Roberts asked the following question:

Counsel, I’m not sure it’s necessary to get into sexual orientation to resolve the case. I mean, if Sue loves Joe and Tom loves Joe, Sue can marry him and

By Brian A. Wadsworth

Employers are well aware that the protections provided by 42 U.S.C. § 1981 extend to both United States citizens and permanent residents, colloquially referred to as “green card holders.”

Some employers, however, may be unaware that lawfully present aliens who are not green card holders may also be protected by § 

By Johanna T. Wise and Andrew J. Masak

Every day new stories about the uses (and misuses) of drones surface in the media.

They have been used to: photograph the 2015 Winter X Games, assist in firefighting operations, monitor agricultural drought, monitor pipelines in remote areas of the world, and take pictures for realtors.  One