Wage & Hour Compliance

By Jaclyn W. Hamlin

Seyfarth Synopsis: Do ambulance drivers working twenty-four hour shifts have to be available all twenty-four hours, even when they’re eating or resting? The Ninth Circuit wants the California Supreme Court’s opinion.

A former ambulance driver in California filed a claim alleging violations of federal and state wage and hour laws.

By Christopher M. Cascino

Synopsis: On May 25, 2017, Seyfarth attorneys Chris DeGroff, Noah Finkel, and Brad Livingston presented their insights on how the Trump administration will affect employers.  Specifically, they discussed the effect the Trump administration is having and will have on the EEOC, the DOL’s Wage and Hour Division, and the NLRB.  All

By Robert Nobile, Courtney Stieber and Samuel Sverdlov

Introduction

Employers of technology innovators should beware the employment traps and risks associated with think tank operations and retreats, such as hackathons. Hackathons are company-sponsored competitions, where either teams or individual software developers (and now increasingly other types of professionals) (here) are given a

In our third installment of articles looking at the employment law cases being heard by the US Supreme Court this fall term, Tyson Foods Inc. v. Bouaphakeo will have importance in both the wage & hour and class action litigation worlds. “Donning and Doffing “ – who knew!

 Another Watershed Moment for Class Actions?  SCOTUS

By Erin Dougherty Foley and Craig B. Simonsen

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), due to pending litigation, had not begun to enforce the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) final rule on protections relating to most home care workers, which rules had an effective date of January 1, 2015. That litigation has now concluded, and

By Annette Tyman, Christine Hendrickson and Kristina M. Launey

Yesterday, October 6, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the   California Fair Pay Act, which media observers have called the nation’s most aggressive equal pay law. The Fair Pay Act will be effective January 1, 2016 for employers with California-based employees.

How Does This Law Differ

By Jacob Oslick

iStock_000023258402MediumWe have previously reported and blogged about challenges to paying employees through debit card-like “paycards.” A recent Pennsylvania decision has amplified those concerns.

In a case of first impression, the trial court in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania found that paying employees through mandatory payroll cards does not comply with a Pennsylvania law, the