Paxton Moore and Robert S. Whitman

Seyfarth Synopsis: New York Governor Kathy Hochul has signed legislation that, effective immediately, adds wage theft to the definition of “larceny” under the state’s penal code, creating potentially harsh penalties for the state’s employers.

Under a recently enacted New York statute, wage theft is considered a form of “larceny” under the state’s penal law.

Continue Reading Wage Theft Now A Form Of Larceny In New York

By Erin Hawthorne, Ana Cid, Tessa Cranfield, Pamela Devata, Mandana Massoumi, Helen McFarland, and Kathryn Weaver

Seyfarth Synopsis: The use of contracting arrangements is widespread; however, around the world, we are seeing trends suggesting this type of work arrangement may become more restricted, higher cost or higher risk to companies in the future. We asked several partners to share

Continue Reading Navigating the New World of Work: Is Contracting on the Way Out?

By Lorraine O’Hara

Seyfarth Synopsis: Seyfarth’s excellent publication “Cal-Peculiarities:  How California Employment Law Is Different,” which is updated annually, highlights the many unique aspects of the Golden State’s employment law.  Increasingly, other states have passed their own progressive employment statutes, warranting their own discussion.  Colorado is one of these states. Discussed below are two Colorado statutes that were

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By Kathryn Weaver, Rachel BernasconiYana Komsitsky, and Leon Mao

In part three of our four-part series on Reductions in Force in Asia Pacific, we looked at severance costs and benefits, key timing challenges, and consultation with employees or employee representatives.

In this final installment of our series, we’ll cover the last three things that we recommend multinational

Continue Reading APAC Reductions in Force Blog Series — Breakdown of the Top 10 Things to Look Out for – Part 4 of 4

By: Andrew Scroggins and James Nasiri

Seyfarth Synopsis: Each Fiscal Year (“FY”), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) releases data on the number of charges it receives from applicants and employees. This data is noteworthy as it reflects the experiences of the American workforce and how individuals feel they have been treated over the past year. In FY 2022, the

Continue Reading Spike in Religious Discrimination Charges Stemming from COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates Fuels Increase in EEOC Charges

By Dawn SoloweyLynn Kappelman, and Darien Harris

Seyfarth Synopsis:  A unanimous Supreme Court has issued its decision in Groff v. Dejoy, clarifying Title VII’s undue hardship standard to mean “substantial increased costs in relation to the conduct of its particular business.”  The Court effectively disavowed the long-standing de minimis standard from the seminal TWA v. Hardison

Continue Reading A Unanimous Supreme Court Rules on Undue Hardship in Religious Accommodation: De Minimis Is Out, “Substantial Increased Costs” Is In

By Adam R. Young, Jennifer L. Mora, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis: Across nationwide testing, marijuana positivity rates for 2022 reached 4.3% (up from 2.7% in 2017), with biggest gains found in states that legalized recreational marijuana. 

Impairment and related safety hazards have been disrupting the workplace resulting in lost time, absenteeism, safety hazards, and serious industrial

Continue Reading High Times: Marijuana Positivity in Workplace Drug Tests Reaches 25-Year Record

By Annette Tyman and Andrew L. Scroggins

Seyfarth Synopsis: On May 18, 2023, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released Technical Assistance on the use of advanced technologies in the workplace titled Select Issues: Assessing Adverse Impact in Software, Algorithms, and Artificial Intelligence Used in Employment Selection Procedures Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“TA”). The

Continue Reading EEOC Issues Technical Assistance Guidance On The Use Of Advanced Technology Tools, Including Artificial Intelligence