Seyfarth Synopsis:  Over the next few weeks, we’re going to weigh in on the growing national debate around the recent wave of sexual harassment allegations.  To date, no one seems immune from the allegations: celebrities, politicians, presidents. See for instance Time Magazine’s Person of the Year 2017 issue. We hope this dialogue will empower employees

By Sam Schwartz-FenwickMichael W. Stevens, and Kylie Byron

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Department of Justice has reversed the previous Administration’s position on employment protections for transgender individuals, and issued a memorandum that will likely be relied on by private employers seeking to use their religious faith to engage in otherwise prohibited discriminatory

By Christopher Im and Sharisse R. Deal

Seyfarth Synopsis: Private employers can face competing obligations when it comes to responding to employees’ expressive conduct. Employee rights may collide with employer obligations to maintain a safe and harassment-free work environment, not to mention the employer’s interest in maintaining productivity and avoiding adverse publicity. Here are

By Sam Schwartz-Fenwick, Michael W. Stevens, and Kylie Byron

Seyfarth Synopsis: The first eight months of the new administration signals a retrenchment on the executive branch’s view of legal protections due LGBT individuals, including in employment.

Recently, in a dramatic shift, the Department of Justice broke ranks with the Equal Employment Opportunity

By: Jonathan L. Brophy

Employers know all too well, or are learning very quickly, that the intersection of their anti-harassment policies and their employees’ Facebook posts is something of a moving target.  Employers often feel unsure as to how far they can go in investigating an employee complaint of a co-worker’s internet conduct.  The United

By: Olushola Ayanbule

Employers may risk peril if they ignore third-party harassment claims.  In Freeman v. Dal-Tile Corp., No 13-1481, 2014 WL 1678422 (4th Cir. April 29, 2014), the Fourth Circuit recently ruled that a negligence standard applies to third-party harassment claims under Title VII.  In other words, just as with co-worker harassment,